Illustrations for Requisitioned Ships, Part 2

Merchant S.B. Co. to Willamette Iron & Steel Works


The photographs below illustrate 12 ship designs that were used to build requisitioned ships but were not carried over into the contract program. Of the many ships requisitioned by the U.S. Shipping Board in August 1917 while under construction, many were built to designs that were later given EFC design numbers and reused to build ships in the contract shipbuilding program. From the yards named above these included EFC Designs 1025 (Merchant), 1012 (Merrill-Stevens), 1015 (Moore), 1103 (New York S.B.), 1014 (Seattle/Todd), 1013 (Skinner & Eddy and Willamette/Northwest), 1063 (Standard), 1018 (Sun), 1044 (Superior and Toledo) and 1032, 1047, and 1057 (Union I.W./Bethlehem Alameda). Many requistioned ships served in the Navy's Naval Overseas Transportation Service in 1918-1919 because they tended to be the first ships in the Shipping Board's programs to be completed.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

S.S. Sagaland, later Mount Shasta
(Moore & Scott Iron Works, Oakland, Cal.)

At her builder's yard on 21 November 1917 shortly before completion. She was built for Richard Amlie, Haugesund, Norway.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-32-S)

 
USS Fairmont
(New York S.B. Co, Camden, N.J.)

This collier is shown on 21 February 1918, a week after she was completed, reconveyed to her owners, and simultaneously taken over by the Navy. Note the short posts on deck for handling the hatch covers.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-19-LCM)

 
USS M. J. Scanlon
(New York S.B. Co, Camden, N.J.)

Photographed on 27 September 1918, a week she was completed and taken over by the Navy. This unusual freighter was specially designed for carrying lumber.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-32-UB)

 
USS Agwidale
(Newport News S.B. & D.D. Co., Newport News, Va.)

Photographed on 1 December 1918. She was completed on 16 November 1918 and simultaneously reconveyed to her owners and taken over by the Navy.

Photo No. NH 65099
Source: U.S. Naval Historical Center

 
S.S. Daniel Webster
(Pennsylvania S.B. Co., later Pusey & Jones, Gloucester, N.J.)

Photographed on 1 November 1919, three days before her completion. This yard built 11 large freighters of this type, including one (William Penn) with diesel propulsion and no smokestack.

Photo No. NH 758
Source: U.S. Naval Historical Center

 
USS Chestnut Hill
(Pennsylvania S.B. Co., later Pusey & Jones, Gloucester, N.J.)

Photographed on 16 March 1918 two days after she was completed and taken over by the Navy. This yard built six tankers of this type.

Photo No. NH 70471
Source: U.S. Naval Historical Center

 
USS Walter A. Luckenbach
(Seattle, later Todd, D.D. & Construction Co., Seattle, Wash.)

On trials on 30 May 1918. Upon completion in early June she was reconveyed to her owners and simultaneously taken over by the Navy. This single ship was similar to the four ships of the South Bend class built for Luckenbach by the Sun S.B. & D.D. Co.

Photo No. NH 65040
Source: U.S. Naval Historical Center

 
S.S. Sag Harbor
(Staten Island S.B. Co., Staten Island, N.Y.)

On trials on 28 August 1918.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-32-S)

 
USS South Bend
(Sun S.B. & D.D. Co., Chester, Pa.)

Arriving in a U.S. port (probably New York) in 1919, with her decks crowded with troops returning from Europe. The small deckhouses added fore and aft probably contained latrines for the troops.

Photo No. NH 104596
Source: U.S. Naval Historical Center

 
USS Sagadahoc
(Texas Steamship Co., Bath, Me.)

Probably photographed around the time of her completion and transfer to the Navy in July 1918.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-32-M box 3)

 
S.S. Lightburne
(Texas Steamship Co., Bath, Me.)

Photographed circa late 1919.

Photo No. None (from ID card)
Source: U.S. Naval Historical Center

 
S.S. War Sword
(Union Iron Works, later Bethlehem S.B., Alameda, Calif.)

In drydock on 15 August 1917. This ship was essentially complete when requisitioned by the U.S. Shipping Board on 3 August 1917 and was quickly released to her British owner, the Cunard Steamship Co., Ltd. She may have been constructed in her builder's San Francisco shipyard.

Photo No. None
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-32-S and UB)