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USS Mackinac (AVP-13) off the Mare Island Navy Yard on 16 September 1943.
Click on this photograph for links to larger images of this class.


Class:        BARNEGAT (AVP-10)
Design:        Navy AVP-10
Displacement (tons):        1,766 light, 2,800 lim.
Dimensions (feet):        311.7'oa, 300.0' pp x 41.1'e x 13.5'lim.
Original Armament:        2-5"/38 (1941-42: AVP 10-11)
Later armaments:        2-5"/38 4<10-20mm (1942: AVP 10-11); 2-5"/38 1-1.1"Q 8<10-20mm (1942: AVP 11-13, 21, 22); 2-5"/38 2-40mmT 12-20mm (1943: AVP-10); 2-5"/38 4-20mm (1943: AVP-23); 2-5"/38 3-40mmT 6-20mm (1945: AGC-18 ex AVP-11); 2-5"/38 6-20mm (1948: AVP-30 as surveying ship); 2-5"/38 4-20mmT 2-20mmS (1949-52: AGS-30 ex AVP-30);
4-5"/38 2-40mmT 8<10-20mm (1943: AVP-12, 22, 25); 4-5"/38 8-20mm (1943: AVP-24, 29, 30);
3-5"/38 2-40mmT 10-20mm (1943: AVP-10); 3-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 6<9-20mm (1943-44: AVP-12, 13, 21, 22, 24, 26, 29, 31-34, 48-52); 3-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 4-20mmT (1945-46: AVP-49);
2-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 8-20mm (1944-46: AVP-10, 21, 22, 24, 50, 52); 2-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 4-20mmT (1946-48: AVP-24, 48, 49, 51, 52);
1-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 6<8-20mm (1944-45: AVP-10, 13, 21, 29, 31-33, 35-41, 50, 53); 1-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 4>2-20mmT (1945-51: AVP-21-22, 25, 31, 35-37, 39, 41, 50, 53-55); same (1952-56: AVP 39-40, 48-49, 53); 1-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 2-20mmT 6-20mm (1946: AVP-40); 1-5"/38 1-40mmQ 2-40mmT 1957: AVP-40); 2-20mmT (1968-69: AGS-50 ex AVP-50);
1-5"/38 2-40mmQ 2-40mmT 4-20mmT (1946-51: AVP 38-41, 53-55);
1-5"/38 2-40mmT 4-20mmT (1949-51: AVP-41); 1-5"/38 2-40mmT (1959-61: AVP-41);
2-40mmQ 2-40mmT 4>0-20mmT (1955-61: AVP-38, 55);
1-40mmQ 2-40mmT (1959-63: AVP 38, 55)
Complement:        254 (1944)
Speed (kts):        18.2
Propulsion (HP):        6,080
Machinery:        Fairbanks Morse Diesels (General Motors in AVP 10-11), 2 screws

Construction:

AVP Name Ord. Builder Keel Launch Commiss.
10 BARNEGAT 1 Sep 38 NYd Puget Sound 26 Oct 39 23 May 41 3 Jul 41
11 BISCAYNE 1 Sep 38 NYd Puget Sound 27 Oct 39 23 May 41 3 Jul 41
12 CASCO 1 Jul 39 NYd Puget Sound 30 May 40 15 Nov 41 27 Dec 41
13 MACKINAC 1 Jul 39 NYd Puget Sound 30 May 40 15 Nov 41 24 Jan 42
21 HUMBOLDT 12 Jun 40 NYd Boston 6 Sep 40 17 Mar 41 7 Oct 41
22 MATAGORDA 12 Jun 40 NYd Boston 6 Sep 40 18 Mar 41 16 Dec 41
23 ABSECON 6 Dec 40 Lake Washington, Houghton 23 Jul 41 8 Mar 42 28 Jan 43
24 CHINCOTEAGUE 6 Dec 40 Lake Washington, Houghton 23 Jul 41 15 Apr 42 12 Apr 43
25 COOS BAY 6 Dec 40 Lake Washington, Houghton 15 Aug 41 15 May 42 15 May 43
26 HALF MOON 6 Dec 40 Lake Washington, Houghton 10 Mar 42 12 Jul 42 15 Jun 43
29 ROCKAWAY 16 Dec 40 Associated Shipbuilders 30 Jun 41 14 Feb 42 6 Jan 43
30 SAN PABLO 16 Dec 40 Associated Shipbuilders 2 Jul 41 31 Mar 42 15 Mar 43
31 UNIMAK 16 Dec 40 Associated Shipbuilders 15 Feb 42 27 May 42 31 Dec 43
32 YAKUTAT 16 Dec 40 Associated Shipbuilders 1 Apr 42 2 Jul 42 31 Mar 44
33 BARATARIA 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 19 Apr 43 2 Oct 43 13 Aug 44
34 BERING STRAIT 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 7 Jun 43 15 Jan 44 19 Jul 44
35 CASTLE ROCK 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 12 Jul 43 11 Mar 44 8 Oct 44
36 COOK INLET 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 23 Aug 43 13 May 44 5 Nov 44
37 CORSON 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 5 Oct 43 15 Jul 44 3 Dec 44
38 DUXBURY BAY 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 17 Jan 44 2 Oct 44 31 Dec 44
39 GARDINERS BAY 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 14 Mar 44 2 Dec 44 11 Feb 45
40 FLOYDS BAY 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 16 May 44 28 Jan 45 25 Mar 45
41 GREENWICH BAY 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 18 Jul 44 18 Mar 45 20 May 45
42 HATTERAS 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton -- -- --
43 HEMPSTEAD 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton -- -- --
44 KAMISHAK 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton -- -- --
45 MAGOTHY 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton -- -- --
46 MATANZAS 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton -- -- --
47 METOMKIN 16 Sep 42 Lake Washington, Houghton -- -- --
48 ONSLOW 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 18 May 42 20 Sep 42 22 Dec 43
49 ORCA 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 13 Jul 42 4 Oct 42 23 Jan 44
50 REHOBOTH 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 3 Aug 42 8 Nov 42 23 Feb 44
51 SAN CARLOS 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 7 Sep 42 20 Dec 42 21 Mar 44
52 SHELIKOF 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 20 Sep 42 31 Jan 43 17 Apr 44
53 SUISUN 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 4 Oct 42 14 Mar 43 13 Sep 44
54 TIMBALIER 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 9 Nov 42 18 Apr 43 24 May 46
55 VALCOUR 14 Apr 42 Lake Washington, Houghton 21 Dec 42 5 Jun 43 5 Jul 46
58 (AVP 58-67) -- (Not awarded) -- -- --

Disposition:
AVP Name Decomm. Strike Disposal Fate MA Sale
10 BARNEGAT 17 May 46 23 May 58 22 Jun 59 Sold --
11 BISCAYNE 29 Jun 46 19 Jul 46 29 Jun 46 USCG --
12 CASCO 10 Apr 47 26 Sep 66 19 Apr 49 USCG --
13 MACKINAC 22 Nov 46 26 Sep 66 19 Apr 49 USCG --
21 HUMBOLDT 19 Mar 47 26 Sep 66 24 Jan 49 USCG --
22 MATAGORDA 20 Feb 46 26 Sep 66 7 Mar 49 USCG --
23 ABSECON 19 Mar 47 26 Sep 66 5 Jan 49 USCG --
24 CHINCOTEAGUE 21 Dec 46 26 Sep 66 7 Mar 49 USCG --
25 COOS BAY 30 Apr 46 26 Sep 66 5 Jan 49 USCG --
26 HALF MOON 4 Sep 46 26 Sep 66 14 Sep 48 USCG --
29 ROCKAWAY 21 Mar 46 26 Sep 66 24 Dec 48 USCG --
30 SAN PABLO 29 May 69 1 Jun 69 14 Sep 71 Sold --
31 UNIMAK 26 Jul 46 26 Sep 66 14 Sep 48 USCG --
32 YAKUTAT 24 Jul 46 26 Sep 66 31 Aug 48 USCG --
33 BARATARIA 24 Jul 46 26 Sep 66 17 Sep 48 USCG --
34 BERING STRAIT 21 Jun 46 26 Sep 66 14 Sep 48 USCG --
35 CASTLE ROCK 6 Aug 46 26 Sep 66 16 Sep 48 USCG --
36 COOK INLET 1947 26 Sep 66 20 Sep 48 USCG --
37 CORSON 9 Mar 56 1 Apr 66 Oct 66 Tgt. --
38 DUXBURY BAY 29 Apr 66 1 May 66 25 Jul 67 Sold --
39 GARDINERS BAY 1 Feb 58 1 May 68 17 May 58 Trf. --
40 FLOYDS BAY 26 Feb 60 1 Mar 60 5 Jul 60 Sold --
41 GREENWICH BAY 29 Jun 66 1 Jul 66 24 May 67 Sold --
42 HATTERAS -- -- 22 Apr 43 Canc. --
43 HEMPSTEAD -- -- 22 Apr 43 Canc. --
44 KAMISHAK -- -- 22 Apr 43 Canc. --
45 MAGOTHY -- -- 22 Apr 43 Canc. --
46 MATANZAS -- -- 22 Apr 43 Canc. --
47 METOMKIN -- -- 22 Apr 43 Canc. --
48 ONSLOW 22 Apr 60 1 Jun 60 18 Oct 60 Sold --
49 ORCA Mar 60 1978? Jan 62 Trf. --
50 REHOBOTH 15 Apr 70 15 Apr 70 25 Sep 70 Sold --
51 SAN CARLOS 7 Dec 71 15 Feb 77 7 Dec 71 Trf. --
52 SHELIKOF 9 Dec 54 1 May 60 20 Dec 60 Sold --
53 SUISUN 5 Aug 55 1 Apr 66 Oct 66 Tgt. --
54 TIMBALIER 15 Nov 54 1 May 60 20 Dec 60 Sold --
55 VALCOUR 15 Jan 73 15 Jan 73 10 Jun 77 Sold --
58 (AVP 58-67) -- -- 19 Oct 42 Canc. --

Class Notes:
FY 1939 (10-11), 1940 (12-13), 1941 (21-32), 1942 (33-67). On 11 Jan 36 the Bureau of Construction and Repair asked CNO for military characteristics for small "Patrol Plane Tenders for VProns," two of which were then in the proposed 1937 building program. CNO referred the matter to the General Board, and in the meantime BuC&R began work on a preliminary design for the ship, taking as its starting point the ERIE (PG-50) class gunboats. On 11 Jul 36 the Bureau asked the Philadelphia Navy Yard for plans of the four 327-foot Coast Guard cutters it was then building, themselves based on the PG-50 design. On 24 Jul 36 the General Board submitted to the Secretary of the Navy its characteristics for small patrol plane tenders based on this preliminary design work and on experience with nine "Bird" class minesweepers which had been used in this role and which had been reclassified AVP 1-9 on 22 Jan 36. The main functions of the type were to be covering extended flights, providing temporary tender services in the absence of larger tenders, and conducting high sea salvage operations to assist and recover ditched aircraft. They were to support a squadron of 12 patrol seaplanes. Their main aircraft handling features were a clear fantail, capable of carrying one patrol plane high enough to keep its wings well clear of the water, and a boom with a 20 ton lift capable of lifting any fully loaded 2-engine plane or a lightened 4-engine plane. Special attention was given to designing the ships to support seaplanes in temporary or advanced bases: their length was to be short enough to permit entrance into small harbors, their draft was to be shallow enough to permit anchoring near seaplane mooring areas, and their ship control characteristics (turning and backing) were to permit operation in narrow and shallow waters and in unfrequented and poorly known areas. The result was a 20-knot (18 knots sustained), twin screw, diesel-propelled ship with a superficial resemblance to a destroyer, emphasized by the two enclosed 5"/38 gun mounts forward.

SecNav assigned the first two ships, AVP 10-11, to the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 30 Jun 38 (an order from BuC&R followed on 1 Sep 38). At this time the design included a Mk. 33 director for the 5" guns similar to that in DD 364-379, which was later omitted. On 3 Sep 38 BuC&R noted to CNO that a boat and airplane crane had been substituted for the original mast and booms, materially changing the profile of the ship and increasing its weight, and on 6 Jun 39 the Bureau asked its representative at the shipyard then building AD 14-15 to send to the Puget Sound Navy Yard the plans for the airplane cranes then being fitted in these tenders for use in AVP 10-11. SecNav added two more of these ships to Puget Sound's order book on 2 Jun 39. While these first units of the new class were under construction, seven old destroyers were converted and reclassified AVP 14-20 as a stopgap measure. AVP 21-32 were included in a large group of auxiliaries whose construction or acquisition was directed on 5 Aug 40 in the 70% Expansion Program (the second increment of the Two Ocean Navy mobilization effort) along with many combatant ships. In mid-December 1941 the Navy began developing a list of its total requirements in ships for a maximum war effort. On 12 Jan 42 the General Board submitted to SecNav a list of the additional ships of each type that would be required, including 35 more small seaplane tenders (AVP 33-67). On 16 Feb 42 SecNav directed the construction of these ships.

The first two ships entered service in July 1941, some five years after their characteristics were approved, and during the rest of the war the class underwent a series of significant configuration changes, primarily involving their armament. The first casualty was the seaplane handling facilities aft--the large aircraft crane (carried only by AVP 10-11 and deleted from AVP 12-13 before completion) was quickly replaced by a smaller 10-ton crane, and the fantail was made available for additional armament to remedy the ships' serious vulnerability to attack from astern. In December 1941 BuShips proposed mounting two additional 5"/38 aft without shields. This idea was approved in November 1942, along with the addition of two 40mm twins amidships. Magazine space for the after 5"/38 guns was to be provided for AVP 33-57 but not retrofitted to the earlier ships. One rationale for the heavy 5" armament was that it was needed for the ships to defend temporary bases.

As part of a general cutback in the shipbuilding program in the spring of 1942 because of a shortage of steel, plans to award AVP 33-49 to Todd Tacoma and AVP 50-67 to Lake Washington were set aside, and instead AVP 50-59 (soon corrected to 48-57) were awarded to Lake Washington on 14 Apr 42 and AVP 33-47 were awarded to Todd Tacoma on 4 May 1942. The net result was the cancellation of ten ships (the April verbal directive to this effect was confirmed for record purposes by a 19 October memorandum). The contract with Todd for AVP 33-47 was then cancelled on 11 Sep 42, and the ships were reordered on 16 Sep 42 from Lake Washington, where they followed AVP 48-57 on the ways. On 16 Dec 42 BUAER recommended cancelling some more AVPs as being in excess of requirements. In lieu of cancellation four were completed as AGP's (q.v.): MOBJACK (ex-AVP 27), OYSTER BAY (28), WACHAPREAGUE (56), AND WILLOUGHBY (57). Six more, AVP 42-47, were cancelled, an additional reason being severe delays in the production of diesel engines for the class.

The class continued to experience armament changes. In early 1943 the commanding officer of CASCO recommended replacing the number three 5"/38 gun with a 40mm quadruple mount on the grounds that the ships were more likely to need to repel air attack than to serve as base defense vessels. This change was directed on 30 May 43. In around April 1944 CNO requested recommendations for a minimum acceptable armament for the BARNEGAT class. This move was motivated by a desire to provide more accessible boat stowage and a larger free deck area within reach of the ship's crane and a need to remedy the overloaded condition of the ships. Because of the increase in size of patrol seaplanes, the nominal number to be supported by an AVP was also to be reduced from 12 to 6. The result, approved on 10 Jul 44, was the removal of two more 5"/38 mounts and the relocation of the 40mm quad mount to a position forward of the bridge. Wood decks were also to be installed on ships which had had them removed or omitted during construction. Protests in early 1945 from Pacific Fleet commands apparently resulted in the rearmament of some ships being suspended and the retention of the aftermost 5" gun on others, including AVP-24.

AVP-23 was completed with two cruiser-type cranes on the after end of the superstructure and one catapult on the port side between them and the stack and served throughout the war as a training ship for cruiser and battleship float plane pilots. AVP 54-55 were awarded to the Puget Sound Navy Yard for completion on 29 Feb 44 but reverted to Lake Washington for completion on 29 Jul 45--despite being laid down in 1942, they were completed only in 1946. Three ships (AVP 21, 22, and 27) were designated in July 1945 for urgent conversion to press ships (AG 121-23) for the invasion of Japan. They were to receive a deckhouse on the boat deck aft of the stack and facilities for voice transmission, radio teletype, and radio telephoto. The need for these conversions evaporated with the surrender of Japan and they were reconverted to AVPs. The 18 ships (including AGP 8-9) transferred to the Coast Guard in 1946-49 were initially loaned and were permanently transferred on 26 Sep 66. As 311-foot cutters these became among the most popular large units in the postwar Coast Guard, and their reputation as fine sea boats was probably exceeded only by the 327-foot HAMILTON class, which had influenced their design. The former AVP 23-24 and AGP-8 were returned by the Coast Guard to the Navy on 7 May 72 for transfer to Vietnam. The dimensions recorded by the Navy for these ships varied slightly, lengths being 311.7 (AVP 10-13), 311.5 (AVP 21-22) and 310.75 (later ships), and beams being 41.1 (AVP 10-13, 21-23) and 41.2 (AVP 24-26, 29-57).

Ship Notes:
AVP Name Notes
10 BARNEGAT In USN reserve 1946-58. Merc. KENTAVROS 1961 (Greek).
11 BISCAYNE In use as a headquarters ship for landing craft by mid-1943. To AGC-18 10 Oct 44 (converted at Boston Navy Yard). To USCG as DEXTER (WAVP-385). To USN 9 Jul 68 for use as a target.
12 CASCO In USN reserve 1946-49. To USCG as CASCO (WAVP-370). To USN 21 Mar 69, sunk as target 15
13 MACKINAC In USN reserve 1946-49. To USCG as MACKINAC (WAVP-371). To USN 21 Jul 68, sunk as target 23 Jul 68.
21 HUMBOLDT In USN reserve 1946-49. To AG-121 30 Jul 45 (Press Ship, OPI No. 2, conversion begun at Philadelphia Navy Yard, cancelled 16 Aug 45 and reconverted), to AVP-21 10 Sep 45. To USCG as HUMBOLDT (WAVP-372). Sold 22 May 70.
22 MATAGORDA In USN reserve 1946-49. To AG-122 30 Jul 45 (Press Ship, OPI No. 1, conversion begun at New York Navy Yard, cancelled 16 Aug 45 and reconverted), to AVP-22 10 Sep 45. To USCG as MATAGORDA (WAVP-373). To USN 30 Oct 68, sunk as target 31 Oct 69.
23 ABSECON In USN reserve 1946-49. To USCG as ABSECON (WAVP-374). Trf. to South Vietnam 15 Jul 72 as THAM NGU LAO. Seized by North Vietnam 1975.
24 CHINCOTEAGUE In USN reserve 1946-49. To USCG as CHINCOTEAGUE (WAVP-375). Trf. to South Vietnam 21 Jun 72 as LY THOUNG KIET. To Philippines Apr 76 as ANDRES BONIFACIO. Stricken 1993.
25 COOS BAY In USN reserve 1946-49. To USCG as COOS BAY (WAVP-376). To USN 2 Dec 67, sunk as target 9 Jan 68.
26 HALF MOON In USN reserve 1946-48. To AGP-6 8 Mar 43, to AVP-26 1 May 43. To USCG as HALF MOON (WAVP-378). Sold 22 May 70.
29 ROCKAWAY In USN reserve 1946-48. To AG-123 30 Jul 45 (Press Ship, OPI No. 3, conversion begun at Boston Navy Yard, cancelled 16 Aug 45 and reconverted), to AVP-29 10 Sep 45. To USCG as ROCKAWAY (WAVP-377). To NDRF 28 Apr 72, sold by Navy (DSSO) 25 Sep 73 with ex-AGP-9, to buyer 25 Jan 74.
30 SAN PABLO In USN reserve 1946-48. To AGS-30 25 Aug 49.
31 UNIMAK In USN reserve 1946-48. To USCG as UNIMAK (WAVP-379). Stk. by USCG 29 Apr 88 [to be museum at Baltimore]
32 YAKUTAT In USN reserve 1946-48. To USCG as YAKUTAT (WAVP-380). To South Vietnam 1 Jan 71 as TRAN NHAT DUAT. To Philippines 5 Apr 76 for spares.
33 BARATARIA Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42). In USN reserve 1946-48. To USCG as BARATARIA (WAVP-381). Sold 25 Sep 70.
34 BERING STRAIT Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42). In USN reserve 1946-48. To USCG as BERING STRAIT (WAVP-382). To South Vietnam 1 Jan 71 as TRAN QUAN KHA. To Philippines Apr 76 as DIEGO SILANG. Decomm. Jun 85.
35 CASTLE ROCK Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42). In USN reserve 1946-48. To USCG as CASTLE ROCK (WAVP-383). To South Vietnam 21 Dec 71 as TRAN VINH TRONG. To Philippines 5 Apr 76 as FRANCISCO DAGAHOY. Decomm. Jun 85.
36 COOK INLET Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42). In commission in reserve 4 Jun 46, decom. ca. Jan 47. In USN reserve 1946-48. To USCG as COOK INLET (WAVP-384). To South Vietnam 21 Dec 71 as TRAN QUOC TOAN. To Philippines 5 Apr 76 for spares.
37 CORSON Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42). In USN reserve 1946-51 and 1955-66. To COMFIRSTFLT 17 Oct 66 for use as target.
38 DUXBURY BAY Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
39 GARDINERS BAY Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42). Trf. to Norway as HAAKON VII (sale 1968). Deleted 1974.
40 FLOYDS BAY Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
41 GREENWICH BAY Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
42 HATTERAS Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
43 HEMPSTEAD Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
44 KAMISHAK Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
45 MAGOTHY Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
46 MATANZAS Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
47 METOMKIN Earlier order: Todd Tacoma (4 May 42).
48 ONSLOW In USN reserve 1947-51. Sold to the Philippine President Lines and served as a ferry in the Philippines. Was hired by the USN to help evacuate South Vietnam in 1975.
49 ORCA In USN reserve 1947-52. Trf. to Ethiopia as ETHIOPIA (sale Mar 76, off NVR Jul-Dec 78). Escaped to Yemen 1991 in unserviceable condition.
50 REHOBOTH To AGS-50 25 Aug 49.
51 SAN CARLOS In USN reserve 1947-58. Renamed JOSIAH WILLARD GIBBS 1 Dec 58, reclas. AGOR-1 15 Dec 58 (converted by Mobile Ship Repair, Inc., Mobile, AL). Trf. to Greece as HIFAISTOS (sale May 77 for parts). Stk. by Greece 7 Apr 76.
52 SHELIKOF In USN reserve 1947-51 and 1954-60. Merc. KYPROS 1961 (Greek), MYKONOS 1963.
53 SUISUN In USN reserve 1955-66. To COMFIRSTFLT 15 Oct 66 for use as target. Sunk as target by USS CATFISH (SS-339).
54 TIMBALIER Was to have been completed by NYd Puget Sd. (order 29 Feb 44) but was returned to Lake Washington (order 29 Jun 45). In USN reserve 1954-60. Merc. RODOS 1961 (Greek).
55 VALCOUR Was to have been completed by NYd Puget Sd. (order 29 Feb 44) but was returned to Lake Washington (order 29 Jun 45). To AGF-1 15 Dec 65. Used as testbed for the nuclear weapons effect/EMP program at the Naval Ordnance Laboratory, White Oak, MD, after stricken.

Page Notes:
AVP        1939

Compiled: 8 Oct 2000
© Stephen S. Roberts, 2000