Monitor Class (LSV 5-6, 3-4): Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Osage (AP-108)

Under construction on 20 July 1943 at the Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp., Pascagoula, Mississippi.
Shown less than a month after her launching. Although she had been reclassified as a transport (AP) while on the ways she is still displaying her netlaying bow.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Montauk (LSV-6)

Photographed on 30 May 1944 by a blimp from Houma, Louisiana, departing on her ferry voyage to New York for conversion to an LSV.
The ship, completed to essentially her original design, retains her low netlayer stern. The boom for her large crane is stowed there as cargo. The netlayer design did not include davits for the boats.

Photo No. 80-G-271295
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

 
USS Osage (AP-108)

Under construction on 10 January 1944 at the Ingalls Shipbuilding Corp., Pascagoula, Mississippi.
The shipyard has begun to modify the ship from a net layer to a transport by raising the hull sides at the stern.

Photo No. 19-N-111702
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Osage (LSV-3)

Fitting out at the Tampa Shipbuilding Co., Tampa, Florida, on 5 July 1944.
The modified stern is complete, although the ramp has not yet been fitted. At this time the ship had both its original armament of 4-5"/38 (including the twin mount seen here) and two pairs of Welin boat davits. The armament was reduced and redistributed before completion because of concerns over stability.

Photo No. 19-N-69091
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Monitor (LSV-5)

Near her conversion yard, Todd Shipyards Corp., Brooklyn, N.Y., on 14 June 1944.
The ship was completed to the original conversion design with two single 5"/38 mounts forward, a twin 5" mount aft, a single pair of Welin boat davits, and a twin 40mm gun mount in a sponson on the side of the superstructure near the stack.

Photo No. 19-N-70637
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Monitor (LSV-5)

Near her conversion yard, Todd Shipyards Corp., Brooklyn, N.Y., on 14 June 1944.
The ship retained the armament in her original conversion design, including the twin 5"/38 mount aft, throughout her career. Her stern ramp has been lowered slightly.

Photo No. USN 70638
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Osage (LSV-3)

Near her conversion yard at Tampa, Florida, on 10 January 1945.
The ship was modified in the late stages of conversion to accommodate two Welin boat davits on each side amidships instead of one. As weight compensation, the twin 5"/38 mount aft was removed, the superfiring 5"/38 single mount forward was moved aft, and the two twin 40mm mounts in sponsons on the side of the superstructure were moved to the superfiring position forward of the bridge.

Photo No. 19-N-81151
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Saugus (LSV-4)

Near her conversion yard at Tampa, Florida, on 5 March 1945.
Note the two Welin boat davits on the port side amidships and the relocated 5"/38 single mount aft.

Photo No. 19-N-81092
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Saugus (LSV-4)

Near her conversion yard at Tampa, Florida, on 5 March 1945.
She was completed with a single instead of a twin 5"/38 gun mount aft.

Photo No. 19-N-81095
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Galilea (AKN-6)

In drydock at the Charleston (S.C.) Naval Shipyard in February 1947 following the cancellation of her conversion to a net cargo ship (AKN).
The AKN conversion involved primarily the stern and interior of the ship, and the only modification evident here is a relocated 20mm gun position.

Photo No. NH 1042501
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Galilea (AKN-6)

In reserve on 26 September 1947 at the U.S. Naval Reserve Fleet berthing area at Charleston, S.C. following the cancellation of her conversion to a net cargo ship (AKN)
Note the partially completed reconfiguration of her stern, including the openings in the upper deck and the relocation of the after twin 40mm mounts and directors. The destroyer tender alongside is probably USS Tidewater (AD-31).

Photo No. 80-G-279294 (extract)
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

 
USS Galilea (AKN-6)

In the Maritime Administration's James River Reserve Fleet circa the mid-1960s, between USS Libra (AKA-12, left) and Adirondack (AGC-15).
Her stern was reconfigured as shown here in late 1946 during a conversion to a net cargo ship that was cancelled while incomplete. The stern was closed off by roller curtain doors. No projections were permitted on bulkheads or other surfaces in areas where nets were handled, but these were not fitted.

Photo No. NH 66856
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command