Alamosa (AK-156) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Poinsett (AK-205)

Probably shown running builder's trials in the Great Lakes circa September 1944.
Her armament has not yet been installed, although she has her wartime life rafts.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Amador (AK-158)

Photographed by her conversion yard in the Columbia River, Oregon, on 4 December 1944 soon after commissioning.

Photo No. 19-N-76408
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Cabell (AK-166)

Photographed circa late 1945.

Photo No. NH 83241
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Faribault (AK-179)

At Pearl Harbor on 18 November 1953.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command (UA-156a)

 
USS Sussex (AK-213)

Photographed on 27 March 1953.

Photo No. 80-G-1078412
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

 
USNS Herkimer (T-AK-188)

Photographed during her long MSTS service between 1951 and 1973.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USNS Pembina (T-AK-200)

Photographed on 22 March 1955.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USCGC Kukui (WAK-186)

Photographed on 7 February 1961.
This ship was originally USS Colquitt (AK-174) and was one of two ships of this class transferred to the Coast Guard in 1946.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command (UA-283)

 
USS YFP-10

Under tow to Thule, Greenland, circa early 1961 to provide power to the Ballistic Missile Early Warning System there.
This ship was built as USS Duval (AK-177) but was cancelled at the end of the war and completed as a merchant ship. She was converted to a non-self propelled power barge between 1952 and 1954. She was given a protective cellular coating to insulate her against cold Arctic weather.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command