Enceladus (AK-80) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

M.V. Nathaniel Mathews (USS BAK-4)

A composite view showning one of the four ships of this type (BAK 1-4) completed to their original design.
See the BAK-1 class for more information on and another image of this configuration. Note the absence of masts except for the light poles on the forecastle and the bridge.

Photo Nos. 19-N-65050 (left) and 65042
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Enceladus (AK-80)

Photographed near Baltimore, Md., in mid or late August 1943 in her original Navy configuration.
The Whirley crane is part of her original design, the two masts were added by the Navy during the ship's conversion.

Photo No. 19-N-51234
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Enceladus (AK-80)

Photographed near Baltimore, Md., on 30 August 1943 in her original Navy configuration.
This image provides a good view of the Whirley crane, which ran on tracks on each side of the hatch covers and which was intended to handle all the cargo carried by the ship. The Navy added the two masts and their cargo booms.

Photo No. 19-N-52141
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Hydra (AK-82)

Near Baltimore in Chesapeake Bay off Fort Carroll on 30 September 1943 five days after commissioning.
A view off the bow showing the provisional rig fitted to the second ship of this type to be completed, in which the Whirley crane was replaced by a kingpost with cargo booms stepped between holds Nos. 1 and 2.

Photo No. 19-N-52625
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Hydra (AK-82)

Near Baltimore in Chesapeake Bay off Fort Carroll on 30 September 1943 five days after commissioning.
A view off the stern showing the provisional rig fitted to the second ship of this type to be completed, in which the Whirley crane was replaced by a kingpost with cargo booms stepped between holds Nos. 1 and 2.

Photo No. 19-N-52626
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Enceladus (AK-80)

Photographed on 10 November 1943 during an inclining experiment at the Norfolk Navy Yard following her second conversion.
The Whirley crane and the original foremast have been replaced with a new foremast stepped between Nos. 1 and 2 holds. The hatch openings and covers have also been reduced in size, and two 20mm guns on pedestals have taken the place of the old foremast.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19 Item S-22 (Inclining experiments)

 
Army Port Repair Ship Thomas F. Farrell, Jr.

Built as USS Europa (AK-81) but transferred to the Army before completion for conversion to a Port Repair Ship, this ship was photographed by a patrol aircraft off the East Coast on 26 August 1944.
Among the many modifications made by the Army were the addition of a 40-ton cathead on the bow for salvage work and a 50-ton boom on the forward side of the foremast.

Photo No. 80-G-420158
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

 
USNS Sagitta (T-AK-87)

Underway circa the mid-1950s.
Although she retains the Army cathead on the bow, she is shown here serving MSTS as a small cargo ship. The two masts reflect the final rig of the class adopted by the Navy in September 1943 and fitted to Enceladus (AK-80), but the built up hull sides from the forecastle to just before the bridge and the elaborate stern anchor date from the Army conversion.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USNS Vela (T-AK-89)

Underway circa the mid-1950s.
In MSTS service she was similar in appearance to Sagitta, above, except that her Army cathead had been removed.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USAT Resource

The former USS Sagitta (AK-87) in use as an Army Reserve training ship at Bayboro Harbor, St. Petersburg, Florida, circa 1974.
A press story dated 13 September 1974 stated that she was soon to be taken under tow to St. Mary's, Georgia, her machinery being unserviceable although her deck and hull were in good shape.

Photo No. None
Source: Shipscribe