Cimarron (AO-22) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Platte (AO-24)

Off the Philadelphia Navy Yard on 19 March 1940 after her preliminary conversion there.
She has been fitted for operation by a Navy crew but carries no armament.

Photo No. 19-N-21954
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Cimarron (AO-22)

Near the Mare Island Navy Yard on 28 November 1942.
Cimarron received her designed armament, shown here, of 4-5"/38 dual purpose guns and one Mk-37 fire control director at Philadelphia between September 1940 and April 1941. Note that the two after mounts lack shields and all four gun positions have splinter protection bulwarks. These bulwarks were soon removed from the positions with enclosed mounts.

Photo No. 19-N-36993
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Salamonie (AO-26)

On trials on 7 November 1941.
She and two sisters (Neosho and Platte) were fitted with the platforms for their planned armament of 4-5"/38 dual purpose guns but these initially contained a temporary armament of 1-5"/51 low-angle gun aft and 3-3"/23 AA guns. Salamonie also received the base for her planned Mk-37 director.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Kaskaskia (AO-27)

Near the Mare Island Navy Yard on 15 December 1941.
She and two sisters (Santee and Guadalupe) were initially fitted with this unusual armament of one low-angle 5"/51 gun and a dual-purpose 3"50 gun on the bow and the same armament on the stern.

Photo No. 19-N-26317
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Platte (AO-24)

Coming alongside USS Wasp (CV-7) on 24 August 1942 to refuel the carrier during the Solomons campaign.
This ship was fitted in 1941 with the same permanent gun emplacements and temporary armament that Salamonie (see above) received, but by August 1942 she had a large gun forward that appears to be a 5"/38. The Bureau of Ordnance Armament Summary contains no record of this armament.

Photo No. 80-G-12235
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Kaskaskia (AO-27)

Near the Mare Island Navy Yard on 28 September 1942.
The 5"/51 and 3"/50 guns initially on the bow have been replaced by a 3"/50 gun and a 1.1" quadruple AA mount.

Photo No. 19-N-35397
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Platte (AO-24)

Off the Mare Island Navy Yard on 26 October 1942 just after receiving her final armament.
Unlike Cimarron, which received the same armement in early 1941, this ship has enclosed mounts both forward and aft. The vertical splinter protection has also been omitted from all four 5" gun positions.

Photo No. 19-N-36490
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Chemung (AO-30)

Near the Norfolk Navy Yard on 30 April 1943.
This ship and one sister (Sabine) received what became the standard wartime armament for large auxiliaries, one 5" gun aft and 4-3"/50 guns, two forward and two aft. This view was taken after Chemung had exchanged her initial 5"/51 gun aft for a 5"/38.

Photo No. 19-N-47642
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Sabine (AO-25)

Photographed circa 1945.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: Shipscribe

 
USS Salamonie (AO-26)

Photographed circa the late 1940s.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Kaskaskia (AO-27)

Photographed on 16 July 1953, probably at Pearl Harbor.
Note the two 3"/50 guns forward, both on the centerline.

Photo No. 80-G-1078418
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-80-G

 
USS Chemung (AO-30)

Photographed circa 1957 after a three month overhaul at the Mare Island Naval Shipyard.
The aft refueling stations on both sides have been strengthened and transformed into a large goalpost mast, an enhancement that appeared on many U.S. Navy oilers at about this time. Chemung had her two forecastle 3"/50 guns mounted at deck level while Sabine (AO-25), which had the same armament, had these guns on raised stands.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Platte (AO-24)

Photographed on 26 August 1964 after refueling USS Yorktown (CVS-10) during a dependents cruise.
The aft refueling stations on both sides have been strengthened and transformed into a large goalpost mast.

Photo No. USN-1108573
Source: Shipscribe

 
USS Kaskaskia (AO-27)

Photographed circa the late 1960s.
In this and some other oilers, the after replenishment stations were strengthened by providing heavier kingposts with angled tops, two to port and one to starboard. By now Kaskaskia's armament has been reduced to one 3"/50 forward and one aft.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command (UA-282)