Gilliam (APA-57) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Gilliam (APA-57)

Steaming at 18 knots during trials on 28 July 1944, a few days before commissioning.
Her 5"/38 gun on the stern is pointed at the camera.

Photo No. Unknown (probably also 80-G-242729)
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Carteret (AP-70)

Off San Pedro, Calif., on 24 December 1944, three weeks after commissioning.

Photo No. 19-N-77259
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Catron (AP-71)

Probably at San Francisco in late 1945 or early 1946.

Photo No. NH 98709
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Cleburne (APA-73)

At Pearl Harbor on 20 March 1946.

Photo No. 19-N-114617
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Cleburne (APA-73)

At Pearl Harbor on 20 March 1946.

Photo No. 19-N-114615
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Fallon (APA-81)

At Pearl Harbor on 22 March 1946.

Photo No. 19-N-114599
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
Operation Crossroads Target Ships

Gilliam-class target ships and support ships at Pearl Harbor between the end of February and mid March 1946. The large Navy ships from bottom to top are Crittenden (APA-77), Catron (APA-71), Bracken (APA-64), Burleson (APA-67) or Niagara (APA-87), Gilliam (APA-57), Fallon (APA-83), an unidentified Liberty ship, Fillmore (APA-83), Kochab (AKS-6), and Luna (AKS-7). To the extreme upper right is the Army power barge Jacona (later YFP-1).

Photo No. 80-G-702126
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Gilliam (APA-57)

Underway at Pearl Harbor in a photograph backstamped 5 May 1946.
Her hull frame numbers have been painted on her side and brackets are visible on the bow and bridge for possible monitoring equipment. Note that little, if any, equipment has been removed from the ship. She was the ship closest to the detonation point of the first atomic bomb tested at Bikini and sank immediately.

Photo No. 19-N-116845
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Crittenden (APA-77)

Off southern California on 5 October 1948 shortly before being sunk in the Demon 11 maneuvers there.
Damaged in the Bikini atomic bomb tests, she was taken to San Francisco for study and then disposed of as an exercise target.

Photo No. 80-G-396970
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command