Allegheny (AT-19) Class: Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

USS Tatnuck (Tug No. 27)

At the Puget Sound Navy Yard on 23 July 1919, three days before commissioning.
Sciota (Tug No. 30) is fitting out on the left.

Photo No. NH 43682
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command

 
USS Allegheny (AT-19)

Serving as station tug at Pensacola, Fla., in 1922.
Her mainmast is missing and the single 3"/50 gun that she briefly carried in 1921-1922 is visible on the starboard side of her forecastle. She was sunk by a screw propeller of the collier Orion at Pensacola on 5 July 1922 but was raised later in the month and remained at Pensacola until 1932, when she moved to Philadelphia.

Photo No. 19-N-8279
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-N box 57

 
USS Sciota (AT-30)

Photographed circa the 1920s.
Sciota was assigned to the 15th Naval District in the Canal Zone from 1920 to 1933, when she was laid up at Philadelphia until 1940. Although not assigned to aviation duty, she is here carrying an aircraft that may have been based at the Coco Solo Naval Air Station. The side number on the aircraft is 8-T-20.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Tatnuck (AT-27)

Photographed circa the 1920s.
She served her entire career in the Pacific Northwest and Alaska. The high lookout platform on the foremast in this class was conspicuous when its canvas cover was fitted.

Photo No. 19-N-16584
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-N box 57

 
USS Kewaydin (AT-24)

Near the Norfolk Navy Yard on 17 November 1941.
The early wartime modifications to most of this class included removing the heavy foremast from in front of the pilot house and stepping a much lighter mast behind it.

Photo No. 19-N-25935
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Pinola (AT-33)

Near the Mare Island Navy Yard on 12 February 1942.
Early in World War II most of this class received four small anti-aircraft guns, initially .50 caliber machine guns as shown here and later 20mm Oerlikons. Pinola's gun arrangement, with single tubs fore and aft, was unusual. Note also the hull bulge, fitted in late 1941 to improve stability.

Photo No. 19-N-28198
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Umpqua (AT-25)

Off the Charleston, S.C., Navy Yard on 3 August 1942.
This tug retains her original heavy foremast but has received four small AA guns (probably .50 caliber machine guns, soon replaced with 20mm weapons), two forward and two aft.

Photo No. 19-N-31984
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USCGC Carrabasset (WAT-55)

Near the Norfolk Navy Yard on 23 July 1943.
Originally Tug No. 35, this vessel was transferred to the Coast Guard in 1924. During World War II she sported a 3"/50 gun forward plus 2-20mm guns abaft the smokestack.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
USS Algorma (ATO-34)

At the Norfolk Navy Yard on 4 June 1945 just before proceeding to the Pacific for her final tour of duty.
The starboard hull bulge, one of two that she and others of the class received in late 1941 to improve stability, is conspicuous in this view, extending from under the bridge to abaft the mainmast.

Photo No. Unknown
Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-LCM

 
S.S. Edward J. Coyle

Formerly USS Keosanqua (AT-38), this tug escaped the postwar scrappers and served under the Canadian flag with this name from 1948 to 1960.

Photo No. NH 89195
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command