Concrete Barges (YO-144 and YOG-40 Classes): Photographs

These photographs were selected to show the original configuration of this class and major subsequent modifications. For most classes many other photographs exist.
For more complete online collections of U. S. Navy ship photographs see in particular the NHHC Online Library of Selected Images and the NavSource Photo Archive.

Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Concrete No. 1

Probably shown after being floated out of her building dock on 13 October 1942 by Concrete Ship Constructors.
The first concrete barge built for the U.S. government since 1920 and the lead ship of her class, she remained a Maritime Commission vessel until commissioning as USS YOG-85 in August 1943.

Photo No. None
Source: Shipscribe

 
Concrete Ship Constructors, National City, Calif.

The company's facilities on 9 March 1943, including Building Docks Nos. 1 and 2 and the Outfitting Dock.
The ships at the outfitting dock are YOG-41, Concrete No.1, YO-144, and YOG-40, probably in that order from left to right. Two hulls are taking shape in the building docks, of which the more advanced, YOG-42, was floated out later in the month.

Photo No. 19-N-42143
Source: U.S. National Archives (RG-19-LCM)

 
USS YO-144

Under tow in San Diego Harbor on 12 March 1943 shortly after completion by her builder, Concrete Ship Constructors.
The tugs are Narkeeta (YT-133, later YTM-133) on the left and YMT-1 (later YTL-86) on the right. The deckhouse amidships is probably a pumproom.

Photo No. 19-N-42120
Source: Arthur D. Baker III

 
USS YO-144

Under tow in San Diego Harbor on 12 March 1943 shortly after completion by her builder, Concrete Ship Constructors.
The tugs are probably Wenonah (YT-148, later YTB-148) on the left and YMT-3 (later YTL-88) and a sister (either YMT-1 or YMT-12) on the right.

Photo No. 19-N-42130
Source: Arthur D. Baker III

 
USS YO-145

Under tow in San Diego Harbor on 14 June 1943 shortly after completion by her builder, Concrete Ship Constructors.
The tug to starboard is probably Wenonah (YT-148, later YTB-148). The stern of Pocahontas (YT-266, later YTB-266) is barely visible to port beyond the barge's rudder.

Photo No. 19-N-47838
Source: Arthur D. Baker III

 
USS YO-145

Under tow in San Diego Harbor on 14 June 1943 shortly after completion by her builder, Concrete Ship Constructors.
The tug is Pocahontas (YT-266, later YTB-266). The function of the additional deckhouse with the smokestack (absent on YO-144) just forward of the pumproom has not been determined, but it is not for propulsion.

Photo No. 19-N-48080
Source: Arthur D. Baker III

 
USS YO-145

Under tow in San Diego Harbor on 14 June 1943 shortly after completion by her builder, Concrete Ship Constructors.
The tug is Wenonah (YT-148, later YTB-148). The original photo caption states that this barge was originally named Concrete No. 6, but this name does not appear in other sources.

Photo No. 19-N-47837
Source: Arthur D. Baker III

 
USS YO-146

Probably shown during her launching (floating out) ceremony on 16 May 1943.

Photo No. None
Source: Courtesy Tim Doyle

 
USS YOG-53

Shown on 29 May 1943 after being floated out of her building dock.

Photo No. None
Source: Courtesy Tim Doyle

 
USS YOG-42

Probably shown in commission in late May 1943.
She is fully fitted out and is flying a jack on the bow.

Photo No. None
Source: Courtesy Tim Doyle

 
USS YOG-42

Probably shown in commission in late May 1943.
Her massive draft is fully evident in this view.

Photo No. None
Source: Courtesy Tim Doyle

 
USS YO-182

Probably shown at her launching ceremony on 6 September 1943.
The elaborate ceremony appears to involve representatives of five countries including the U.S., U.K., USSR, and Republic of China plus a band and onlookers from the workforce and the community.

Photo No. None
Source: Courtesy Tim Doyle

 
USS YOG-41

In service at an advance base in the Pacific with an LST alongside, probabley to receive diesel fuel.

Photo No. NH 92968
Source: U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command