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UNITED STATES NAVY
TEMPORARY AUXILIARY SHIPS
WORLD WAR I

Photo # NH 104064:  Freighter Elinor, possibly at Baltimore, Maryland, on 25 February 1918


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-- CIVILIAN SHIPS --

S.S. Elinor (American Freighter, 1918).
Originally named General de Castlenau.
Served as USS Elinor (ID # 2465) in 1918-1919

Elinor, a 4295.18 gross ton (8785 tons displacement) freighter, was built at Baltimore, Maryland, in 1917-1918. She was originally named General de Castlenau, but had been renamed by late February 1918, when she was inspected by the Fifth Naval District for possible U.S. Navy use. The ship was delivered to the Navy in March of that year and placed in commission as USS Elinor (ID # 2465). As a unit of the Naval Overseas Transportation Service (NOTS) she made four round-trip voyages to France in the year following April 1918, carrying general cargo, vehicles and ammunition. In February 1919 she also performed a special mission, in which she dumped artillery shells and poison gas in deep water off the Virginia Capes. USS Elinor was decommissioned in late April 1919 and returned to the U.S. Shipping Board.

This page features all available views concerning the freighter Elinor of 1918, which was USS Elinor (ID # 2465) in 1918-1919.


Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 104064

S.S. Elinor
(American Freighter, 1918)

Possibly photographed at Baltimore, Maryland, on 25 February 1918, when she was inspected by the Fifth Naval District.
Built by the Baltimore Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company, and originally named General de Castlenau, this ship was taken over by the Navy for World War I service and placed in commission on 20 March 1918 as USS Elinor (ID # 2465). She was decommissioned and returned to the U.S. Shipping Board on 26 April 1919.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 41KB; 740 x 265 pixels

 
Photo #: None

USS Elinor
(ID # 2465)

Photographed on 22 March 1918 at the yard of her builder, the Baltimore Dry Dock and Shipbuilding Company, Baltimore, Md. She had been in commission for two days.

Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-32-M box 13.

 


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