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UNITED STATES NAVY
TEMPORARY AUXILIARY SHIPS
WORLD WAR I

Photo # NH 50252:  USS Mongolia at the New York Navy Yard, 28 June 1918

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- U.S. NAVY SHIPS --

USS Mongolia (ID # 1615), 1918-1919.
Previously, and later, S.S. Mongolia

In April 1918 the U.S. Navy took over the 13,638 gross ton passenger-cargo steamship Mongolia (built in 1904). Placed in commission in early May as the transport USS Mongolia (ID # 1615), she carried troops to Europe until the November 1918 Armistice, then began bringing American veterans home from the former war zone. She was decommissioned in September 1919 and returned to her owner.

This page features, and provides links to, all available views concerning USS Mongolia (ID # 4031).

For more views related to this ship, see:

  • S.S. Mongolia (Passenger-Cargo Steamship, 1904).


    Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

    Photo #: NH 50252

    USS Mongolia
    (ID # 1615)

    Photographed by the New York Navy Yard on 28 June 1918 after being painted in pattern camouflage.

    U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

    Online Image: 89KB; 740 x 590 pixels

     
    Photo #: 19-N-1477

    USS Mongolia
    (ID # 1615)

    Photographed by the New York Navy Yard on 28 June 1918 after being painted in pattern camouflage.

    Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-19-N box 56.

     
    Photo #: NH 105722

    USS Mongolia
    (ID # 1651)

    In port, while painted in "dazzle" camouflage, circa 1918.
    The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

    Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

    U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

    Online Image: 55KB; 740 x 475 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 106646

    USS Mongolia
    (ID # 1651)

    In harbor with barge and a passenger ferry alongside, circa 1918.
    The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

    Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2009.

    U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

    Online Image: 87KB; 900 x 570 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 106599

    USS Mongolia
    (ID # 1615)

    Ship's after six-inch gun, with several shells, circa 1918.
    This gun was nicknamed "Teddy", after former President Theodore Roosevelt.
    The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

    Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2009.

    U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

    Online Image: 74KB; 900 x 560 pixels

     
    Photo #: NH 82951

    "The Original U.S. Troop Transports"


    Chart compiled 16 August 1919, showing the number of trans-Atlantic "turn arounds" and their average duration for thirty seven U.S. Navy troop transports employed during and immediately after World War I.

    Collection of the USS Pocahontas Reunion Association, 1974.

    U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

    Online Image: 157KB; 690 x 655 pixels

    Click here to rotate chart 90 degrees clockwise

     


    USS Mongolia (ID # 1615) is in the left center distance in the following photograph:

    Photo #: NH 106288

    World War I Troop Transport Convoy at Sea


    The most distant ship, in left center, is USS Mongolia (ID # 1615). The nearer ship, mis-identified on the original print as USS Mercury (ID # 3012), is actually USS Madawaska (ID # 3011).
    Photographed by "V.J.M.".

    Donation of Charles R. Haberlein Jr., 2008.

    U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

    Online Image: 61KB; 740 x 445 pixels

     


    For more views related to this ship, see:

  • S.S. Mongolia (Passenger-Cargo Steamship, 1904).


    NOTES:

  • To the best of our knowledge, the pictures referenced here are all in the Public Domain, and can therefore be freely downloaded and used for any purpose.

  • Some images linked from this page may bear obsolete credit lines citing the organization name: "Naval Historical Center". Effective 1 December 2008 the name should be cited as: "Naval History and Heritage Command".


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    Page made 21 December 2009