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UNITED STATES NAVY
TEMPORARY AUXILIARY SHIPS
WORLD WAR I

Photo #  NH 65061-A:  S.S. Jeannette Skinner, later USS Jeannette Skinner (ID # 1321), on 30 June 1917

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- CIVILIAN SHIPS --

S.S. Jeannette Skinner (American Freighter, 1917)
Originally S.S. J. M. Fox.
Served as USS Jeannette Skinner (ID # 1321) in 1918-1919.

Jeannette Skinner, a 5700 gross ton freighter, was completed by the Skinner & Eddy Corp. at Seattle, Washington, in September 1917. First named J. M. Fox by her builder, she was renamed Jeannette Skinner by the Norwegian shipping firm Knut Knutsen OAS, which bought her before she was launched.

The freighter was commandeered by the U.S. Shipping Board in August 1917 and was commissioned in the Navy on 12 April 1918 as USS Jeannette Skinner (ID # 1321). After loading a cargo of general supplies at Baltimore, Maryland, she sailed from New York in May with a convoy for Brest, France. Returning to New York in June, Jeannette Skinner loaded another Army cargo at Baltimore and delivered it at Brest and Bordeaux, France, in August. Her third eastbound voyage took her from New York to La Pallice and Bordeaux in September and October. While in the Gironde River, France, on 27 November 1918, she was damaged in collision with the Japanese steamer Ceylon Maru. During her return voyage in December the ship had to put in to Bermuda for fuel and, upon arrival at Baltimore, entered drydock to begin two months of repairs. In March and April 1919 Jeannette Skinner carried a cargo of wheat, oats, and lard to Cette, France, via Gibraltar on behalf of the Southern Food Administration. Once again she had to refuel on her homeward voyage, this time in the Azores. USS Jeannette Skinner was decommissioned at Baltimore on 10 June 1919 and was returned to the Shipping Board.

In 1937 she was sold by the Shipping Board to a British firm based in Shanghai. S.S. Jeannette Skinner was taken over by the British Ministry of War Transport in August 1944, transferred to the U. S. War Shipping Administration in December 1944, and scrapped at Baltimore in August 1945.

Note: This ship's name is sometimes (and incorrectly) spelled "Jeanette Skinner".

This page features all available views concerning the American freighter Jeannette Skinner (originally named J. M. Fox) and USS Jeannette Skinner (ID # 1321).


Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 65061-A

S.S. Jeannette Skinner
(American Freighter, 1917)

Just after launch at the Skinner and Eddy Corporation shipyard, Seattle, Washington, 30 June 1917.
Laid down as J. M. Fox, she was renamed Jeannette Skinner by the Norwegian owner Knut Knutsen and was then commandeered by the U.S. Shipping Board and delivered to that agency on 2 August 1917. On 12 April 1918 the ship was taken over by the Navy and commissioned as USS Jeannette Skinner (ID # 1321). She was returned to the Shipping Board on 10 June 1919.
Note the Norwegian flag and the name Jeannette Skinner on the ship's bow, the U.S. Ensign at her stern and the flag amidships featuring a large letter "K".

The original print is in National Archives' Record Group 19-LCM.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 56KB; 740 x 605 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 104118

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

Photograph dated July 1918.
The original image was printed on postal card stock.
The following is hand written on the card's reverse side: "Loading supplies at Hampton Roads en route to France from Baltimore."
Note: Some sources spell this ship's name as Jeanette Skinner.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2006.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 49KB; 740 x 445 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 105474

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

In drydock for repair of damage to her bow, following her 27 November 1918 collision with the Japanese steamship Ceylon Maru in the Gironde River, France.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 52KB; 420 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 105475

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

Crewmembers show off, while painting the ship's mainmast, circa 1918-1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("K Ltd") stock.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 51KB; 420 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 105476

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

Firing the ship's after gun, circa 1918.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock. Its reverse bears the hand-written comment: "Jeannette Skinner firing on a submarine".

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 84KB; 740 x 445 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 105477

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

Boxing match on board the ship, just aft of the midships superstructure, circa March-April 1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("AZO") stock. It's reverse bears the hand-written comment: "A boxing match on the Skinner the first day in Spain".

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 84KB; 740 x 445 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 105478

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

One of the ship's Chief Petty Officers tours ruins, probably in France or Spain, circa 1918-1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("K Ltd") stock. Its reverse bears the hand-written comment: "Chief Electrician on the Skinner".

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 58KB; 425 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 105479

USS Jeannette Skinner
(ID # 1321)

One of the ship's Chief Petty Officers tours an old port city, probably in France or Spain, circa 1918-1919.
The original image is printed on post card ("K Ltd") stock. Its reverse bears the hand-written comment: "Doctor on the Skinner", so he may be a Chief Pharmacist's Mate.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2008.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 76KB; 740 x 445 pixels

 


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Page made 8 December 2007
New images added and introductory text revised 9 March 2008