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UNITED STATES NAVY
TEMPORARY AUXILIARY SHIPS
WORLD WAR I

Photo #  NH 101619:  S.S. Westward Ho soon after she was torpedoed, August 1918


Online Library of Selected Images:
-- CIVILIAN SHIPS --

S.S. Westward Ho (American Freighter, 1918). Served as USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098) in 1918-1919

S.S. Westward Ho, a 5730 gross ton (12,185 tons displacement) freighter, was built in 1917-1918 at at Portland, Oregon. Operated with a civilian crew, she was employed carrying cargo between the United States and Europe until 8 August 1918, when she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-62. Though badly damaged, the ship was able to make port at Brest, France. The Navy took over the newly-repaired steamer in mid-October 1918, placing her in commission as USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098). Following a voyage to New York in November and December, she was sailed for Europe with a cargo that included food to help sustain the hungry people of that war-devastated continent. She returned to the U.S. late in March 1919. USS Westward Ho was decommissioned in April and returned to the U.S. Shipping board. Though apparently laid up for most of the next two decades, in 1937 she became the Japanese merchantman Westward Ho Maru and a year later was renamed Izan Maru. She survived World War II, no mean feat for a Japanese ship, and operated until the late 1940s.

This page features all available views concerning the freighter Westward Ho, of 1918, and USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098).


Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 101619

S.S. Westward Ho
(American Freighter, 1918)

Photographed in the eastern Atlantic, soon after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-62, on 8 August 1918.
Following repairs, this ship became USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098).
Note her pattern camouflage.

Courtesy of Jack Howland, 1987.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 41KB; 740 x 445 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 89150

S.S. Westward Ho
(American Freighter, 1918)

U.S. Navy destroyers standing by the damaged ship, after she was torpedoed by the German submarine U-62 in the eastern Atlantic on 8 August 1918.
Following repairs, this ship became USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098).

Collection of Lieutenant Commander P. W. Yeatman, USN (Retired).

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 52KB; 740 x 545 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 103139

S.S. Westward Ho
(American Freighter, 1918)

Is towed into harbor at Brest, France. She had been torpedoed by the German submarine U-62 on 8 August 1918. Following repairs, this ship became USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098).
The original image was printed on postal card ("AZO") stock.
Note the presumably phonetically derived spelling of the ship's name on the original print.

Donation of Dr. Mark Kulikowski, 2005.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 69KB; 740 x 470 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 64992

S.S. Westward Ho
(American Freighter, 1918)

View of the ship's starboard side, forward, showing torpedo damage inflicted by the German submarine U-62 in the eastern Atlantic on 8 August 1918.
Following repairs, this ship became USS Westward Ho (ID # 3098).

Collection of Peter K. Connelly. Courtesy of William H. Davis, 1967.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 47KB; 450 x 765 pixels

 
Photo #: NH 41669

USS Westward Ho
(ID # 3098)

In drydock at the Philadelphia Navy Yard, circa 1918-1919.
Photographed by the Philadelphia "Evening Ledger".
Note the crane at right, apparently lifting a large square object on or off the ship.

U.S. Naval History and Heritage Command Photograph.

Online Image: 76KB; 740 x 575 pixels

 


NOTES:

  • To the best of our knowledge, the pictures referenced here are all in the Public Domain, and can therefore be freely downloaded and used for any purpose.

  • Some images linked from this page bear obsolete credit lines citing the organization name: "Naval Historical Center". Effective 1 December 2008 the name should be cited as: "Naval History and Heritage Command".


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    Page made 26 November 2005
    New image added 11 January 2009