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UNITED STATES NAVY
TEMPORARY AUXILIARY SHIPS
WORLD WAR I

Photo #  NH 65080:  S.S. Zaca, later USS Zaca, on 20 December 1918

Online Library of Selected Images:
-- CIVILIAN SHIPS --

S.S. Zaca (American Freighter, 1918)
Served as USS Zaca (ID # 3792) in 1918-1919.

Zaca, a 6204 gross ton (12,700 tons displacement) freighter, was completed at Oakland, California, in December 1918. She was commissioned in the Navy on 30 December 1918 as USS Zaca (ID # 3792). In early January 1919 the new freighter sailed from San Francisco Bay for Hampton Roads, Virginia with a full cargo of flour consigned to the U. S. Food Administration. After bunkering she proceeded to Rotterdam, the Netherlands, and from there moved to the free city of Danzig where she discharged her cargo. Returning in ballast via Rotterdam and southern England, Zaca arrived at New York in late April. She was decommissioned on 12 May 1919, returned to the U.S. Shipping Board and was then operated commercially. In October 1920 S.S. Zaca was burned out following the rupture of an engine room oil pipe. Her hulk was towed to New York and lay there until scrapped in January 1924.

This page features all available views concerning the American freighter Zaca, which was USS Zaca (ID # 3792) in 1918-1919.


Click on the small photograph to prompt a larger view of the same image.

Photo #: NH 65080

S.S. Zaca
(American freighter, 1918)

Shown on builder's trials on 20 December 1918. This freighter was in commission as USS Zaca (ID # 3792) from 30 December 1918 to 12 May 1919.

U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

Online Image: 73KB; 740 x 490 pixels

 
Photo #: None

S.S. Zaca
(American freighter, 1918)

Photographed on 24 December 1918 alongside a refrigerated sister, S.S. Oskawa, at the yard of their builder, Moore Shipbuilding Co, Oakland, Calif.

Source: U.S. National Archives, RG-32-S.

 
Photo #: None

S.S. Zaca
(American freighter, 1918)

In the port of Rotterdam, Holland, on 9 April 1919.

Source: Courtesy Dr. Mark Kulikowski.

 


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Page made 8 December 2007